Skip Navigation

Click for Lion Brand Yarn Home Page
separator
Our Yarns
The LB Collection
Martha Stewart Crafts
Request Free Catalog
Our Yarns
Yarn by Weight
separator
New Catalog
separator
Shop
separator
  • free patterns
  • special sales
  • new items
  • 15% off coupon
    US orders only
    view past newsletters   Click to view newsletters and subscription choice
separator
Free Catalog
separator
Patterns
separator
Lion Brand
     Yarn Studio
     Retail Store, New York, NY
separator
Lion Brand
     Yarn Shop
     Retail Store, Colonie, NY
separator
Lion Brand Outlet
     Retail Store, Carlstadt, NJ
separator
Find a Store
post code:
country:
within:
more options   Click for more store-locator options
separator
Home : Community : Newsletters & Stories
 

Newsletters & Stories

Favorite Articles
Stories from the Prayer Shawl Ministry
Charity Stories

 
 
Search:  
 
Click here to share your story.
Print
Print
Hints & Tips on Knitting Decreases
By: Barbara Breiter
 

When you decrease in knitting, you are not always losing stitches. Decreases are used in lace patterns, for example, and youíll almost always have the same number of stitches after completing the row because the decreases are balanced by increases (most likely yarn overs). Lace pattern stitches will specify which decrease to use; the correct decrease is important because it impacts which way the fabric biases or slants.

Decreases are also used for shaping projects, such as sweaters and even purses, and you will be subtracting stitches. As in lace patterns, the correct decrease will help the fabric to slant in the direction it should. Patterns for garments will sometimes tell you which decrease to use when you are shaping the armholes and neck; other times the designer will assume you are already armed with this knowledge and you are left on your own. You could use the default k2tog decrease and turn out a perfectly fine sweater. But the correct decrease will give it a more professional look.

Which decrease to use is really quite logical. Although there are many more decreases available, itís important to know that ssk slants to the left and k2tog slants to the right. These two decreases match each other in terms of appearance.

Armholes move inward as you decrease. As you are looking at the right side of your work, the armhole on the right slants left and the armhole on the left slants right. Therefore, ssk, which again slants left, is the decrease used at the beginning of a row and k2tog, a right slanting decrease, at the end of a row.

When shaping necklines, it is the opposite; they move outward as you decrease. As you are looking at the right side of your work, the neckline shaping on the right slants to the right so you would use k2tog; the shaping on the left slants to the left so you would use ssk.

Work decreases at least one stitch in from the edge. This makes seaming much easier as well as picking up stitches along the neckline.

See our Learn to Knit guide for videos, illustrations, and more on decreasing and other skills, and join Barbara again next month for more tips for knitters and crocheters.



Authored by Barbara Breiter

Barbara Breiter is the author of THE COMPLETE IDIOT'S GUIDE TO KNITTING & CROCHETING. Find her online at http://www.knittingonthenet.com/
 
separator separator
Bookmark This!  separator
Sign up for our Newsletter  
separator Share This!  separator About Us separator Contact Us separator
  Font Size:   
Click to view page with standard font Click to view page with larger font Click to view page with largest font